Another Lost Phone

“This game is designed as a narrative investigation where you must piece together elements from the different applications, messages and pictures to progress. Scrolling through the phone’s content, you will find out everything about Laura: her friendships, her professional life and the events that led to her mysterious disappearance and the loss of this phone.” – Developer

Cards Against Colonialism

“We are stronger when we laugh and humor makes it easier to talk about difficult issues. Cards Against Colonialism attempts to embrace the modern Native Culture, and allows us to learn and laugh at the same time.” – Publisher

Ethics 101

“Gamasutra interviews Bethesda’s Emil Pagliarulo and 2K Marin’s Jordan Thomas to discuss the importance of building challenging, satisfying ethical gameplay — both in games the duo created such as Oblivion, Fallout 3 and BioShock 2, and in the work of others.” – J. Matthew Zoss

Values at Play in Digital Games

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“In this book, Mary Flanagan and Helen Nissenbaum present Values at Play, a theoretical and practical framework for identifying socially recognized moral and political values in digital games. Values at Play can also serve as a guide to designers who seek to implement values in the conception and design of their games.” – Publisher

Gaming’s favorite villain is mental illness, and this needs to stop

“Representation is the key to kickstarting discussion, and video games have taken a woefully one-dimensional approach in the mental health conversation. While there’s no shortage of mental health-related content in today’s games, it falls into one of two specific camps, neither of which confront the complex and nuanced issues with the empathy and consideration they deserve.” – Patrick Lindsey

Gaming Under Socialism

“…the question of what gaming would look like in a socialist world has haunted me for days. Not only because I’m a leftist and I care about games, but because of how it relates to many crucial issues of 21st century radicalism…” – Paolo Pedercini

A Theory of Fun

“A Theory of Fun for Game Design is not your typical how-to book. It features a novel way of teaching interactive designers how to create and improve their designs to incorporate the highest degree of fun. As the book shows, designing for fun is all about making interactive products like games highly entertaining, engaging, and addictive. The book’s unique approach of providing a highly visual storyboard approach combined with a narrative on the art and practice of designing for fun is sure to be a hit with game and interactive designers.” – Publisher