Gaming’s favorite villain is mental illness, and this needs to stop

“Representation is the key to kickstarting discussion, and video games have taken a woefully one-dimensional approach in the mental health conversation. While there’s no shortage of mental health-related content in today’s games, it falls into one of two specific camps, neither of which confront the complex and nuanced issues with the empathy and consideration they deserve.” – Patrick Lindsey

Burn the Boards

“Ever wondered what happened to the old mobile phone you threw away? In the unique puzzle simulation game “Burn The Boards” you can experience the reality of an informal worker, who breaks down e-waste for a living.” –

Big Pharma

“What if you had it in your power to rid the world of disease, to improve the lives of millions, to ease suffering and cure the sick… and earn a tidy profit? As the head of your own Pharmaceutical Conglomerate you have this power resting in your hands. Will you use it for good? Being totally altruistic may not be the best business plan. The uncomfortable truth (is there an ointment for that?) is that some remedies are more profitable than others and illness is good for business. Welcome to the world of Big Pharma!” – Twice Circled

Sea Hero Quest

“Dementia is a growing health threat. Affecting over 47M people worldwide (135M by 2050), it is becoming one of the greatest medical challenges we face globally. To help scientists working towards finding a cure, we created Sea Hero Quest – a mobile game where anyone can help fight dementia. ” – Glitchers

Video Games for Health

“Substantial resources are being committed to the development of so-called ‘serious’ video games as interventions for health issues. Health educators and others with an agenda for educating young people are well aware that this group buys video games and spends a lot of time playing them. Games therefore seem to have promise as a vehicle for…”

Depression Quest

“Depression Quest is an interactive fiction game where you play as someone living with depression. You are given a series of everyday life events and have to attempt to manage your illness, relationships, job, and possible treatment.” – Depression Quest

Actual Sunlight

“Actual Sunlight is a short interactive story about love, depression and the corporation. The game puts you in the role of Evan Winter, a young professional in Toronto, as he moves through three distinct periods of his life. The story is linear, unavoidable and (hopefully) thought-provoking. You experience his perceptions, fall under the consequences of his decisions, and meet everyone who didn’t change him.” – Actual Sunlight