Games of Empire

“Games of Empire offers a radical political critique of such video games and virtual environments as Second Life, World of Warcraft, and Grand Theft Auto. Rejecting both moral panic and glib enthusiasm, Games of Empire demonstrates how virtual games crystallize the cultural, political, and economic forces of global capital, while also providing a means of…

Understanding Video Games

“Understanding Video Games, 2nd Edition is an essential read for newcomers to video game studies and experienced game scholars alike. This follow-up to the pioneering first edition takes video game studies into the next decade of the twenty-first century, highlighting changes in the game business, advances in video game scholarship, and recent trends in game…

Tomb Raiders and Space Invaders

“Videogames now rival Hollywood cinema in popularity and profits and there are huge followings for titles such as Tomb Raider or The Sims. Exactly what games offer, however, as a distinct form of entertainment, has received scant attention. This book is a valuable contribution to this new field. Its main focus is on key formal…

Children’s Games and Gaming

“The conceptual and methodological framework I will be developing approaches children’s folk games not as sets of game rules, but as highly situated social contexts in which real players collectively construct a complex and richly textured communal experience. Curator: Michael Hancock

On Not Becoming Gamers

“I want to make sense of how players who fall outside the constructed norm of ‘hardcore,’ white, heterosexual, cisgendered male players within the U.S. context relate to this medium and how this might reform arguments for representation in the medium. Drawing upon the insights of feminist media scholars like Ien Ang (1991), Janice Radway (1988),…

Play Between Worlds

“In Play Between Worlds, T. L. Taylor examines multiplayer gaming life as it is lived on the borders, in the gaps—as players slip in and out of complex social networks that cross online and offline space. Taylor questions the common assumption that playing computer games is an isolating and alienating activity indulged in by solitary…