Whip the Vote

“Whip the Vote is a Congress simulator, inspired by House of Cards, where you play as the Whip for the Democratic Party.

You’re prodded on by President Hessell and opposed by your rival, the Republican Whip, as you work towards passing Democrat supported Bills, killing Republican supported Bills and securing more seats in Congress for the Democrats during Elections.” – Official Game Page

Newsgames

“Journalism has embraced digital media in its struggle to survive. But most online journalism just translates existing practices to the Web: stories are written and edited as they are for print; video and audio features are produced as they would be for television and radio. The authors of Newsgamespropose a new way of doing good journalism: videogames.” – MIT Press

Pulling Back the Curtain

“Let’s pull back the curtain. In this essay, I recount a pedagogical experience with 60 undergraduate history majors at Carleton University where students learned to write for the web and learned how the web is written, including how algorithms (sets of rules) create the content and the experiences that we have online. I am not talking about writing essays. I am talking about making video games. Or more accurately, about learning to write history-through-algorithms.” [Excerpt from “Pulling Back the Curtain” in Web Writing: Why and How for Liberal Arts Teaching and Learning]

California Water Crisis

“Can you solve the drought? California Water Crisis is an educational game about California water politics. Take the role of one of California’s three main regions (NorCal, SoCal, and the Central Valley) and try to find a solution to the fundamental cause of California’s drought: there’s more water demand than there’s water.” – Developer

Games and Journalism Podcast

“As a journalist covering games since 2001, Chaplin has seen a lot of changes in the industry and among game academics. In this talk she will give an overview of the most important and interesting trends, including emerging thinking on ideas about game literacies and the acceptance of games as facilitators of transformative experiences.” – Comparative Media Studies, MIT

Aftershock

“A Humanitarian Crisis Game explores the interagency cooperation needed to address a complex humanitarian crisis. Although designed for four players, it can be played with fewer (even solitaire) or more (with players grouped into four teams). The game is set in the fictional country of “Carana,” but is loosely modeled on disasters such as the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2010 Haiti earthquake.” – PAXsims

Playing with the Past

“Game Studies is a rapidly growing area of contemporary scholarship, yet volumes in the area have tended to focus on more general issues. With Playing with the Past, game studies is taken to the next level by offering a specific and detailed analysis of one area of digital game play — the representation of history. The collection focuses on the ways in which gamers engage with, play with, recreate, subvert, reverse and direct the historical past, and what effect this has on the ways in which we go about constructing the present or imagining a future…”

Game Design – MIT Open Courseware

“This course provides practical instruction in the design and analysis of non-digital games. Students cover the texts, tools, references and historical context to analyze and compare game designs across a variety of genres, including sports, game shows, games of chance, card games, schoolyard games, board games, and role–playing games. In teams, students design, develop, and…